DC KIDS COUNT

DC KIDS COUNT®, a project of DC Action for Children and the Annie E. Casey Foundation, tracks the well-being of the District's children and youth.

By providing high-quality data and trend analysis, DC KIDS COUNT seeks to enrich local discussions about ways to secure better futures for all children and youth — and to raise the visibility of kids' issues through a nonpartisan, evidence-based lens.

DC KIDS COUNT is part of the network of local-level organizations in all 50 states, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia that provide a community-by-community picture of the condition of children. The network organizations also monitor budget and legislative decisions in the states and provide policy analysis based on evidence of what works for children and families.


Featured Resources


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​2019 KIDS COUNT Data Book

Full report and DC press release


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2019 KIDS COUNT

District of Columbia Data Profile on Kids Well-Being


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2019 KIDS COUNT

Data Snapshot: Keeping Kids in Families: Trends in U.S. Foster Care Placement

Four-page Snapshot and DC press release


DATA SNAPSHOT

2017 Ward Snapshots: Tracking Child Well-Being in Your Ward

Do you know the birth, health and education trends for children in your ward? Learn more from the newest edition of DC KIDS COUNT’s Ward Snapshots.


POLICY BRIEF

Trends in Third Grade Reading Proficiency

An Analysis of DC CAS Results (2007-2014)


DATA SNAPSHOT

2015 Ward Snapshots: Tracking Child Well-Being in Your Ward


POLICY BRIEF

Giving Hispanic Students a Chance to Succeed from the Start

How Early Childhood Providers and Policy Makers in the District of Columbia can Support Young Hispanic Children’s Access to High-Quality Early Care and Education


POLICY BRIEF

Attendance Counts from the Start

How Education Leaders and Policymakers in the District of Columbia Can Decrease Chronic Early Absenteeism starting from Pre-K


ATTENDANCE SNAPSHOT

Attendance in DC Public Charter Schools: 2012-2013

If children are not in school, they are not learning the skills they need to graduate ready for college and a career. Absenteeism is extremely high in DC charter and public schools: 1 in 5 DC students had more than 10 unexcused absences last year. Chronic absenteeism increases achievement gaps because students from disadvantaged backgrounds with high absenteeism are more likely to fall behind academically.


ATTENDANCE SNAPSHOT

Attendance in DC Public Schools: 2012-2013

If children are not in school, they are not learning the skills they need to graduate ready for college and a career. Absenteesim is extremely high in DC public and charter schools: 1 in 5 DC students had more than ten unexcused absences last year. Chronic absenteeism increases achievement gaps because students from disadvantaged backgrounds with high absenteeism are more likely to fall behind academically.


DATA SNAPSHOT

Young Children – Our City’s Future

The number of young children is growing in the District of Columbia. Are DC neighborhoods ready for them? The first five years of cognitive and social development establish a foundation for a child’s school achievement and success as an adult. With an expanding young child population in DC, now is the time to make sure our city and all of our neighborhoods are places for children to flourish in their first five years and beyond.


DATA SNAPSHOT

Children’s Mental Health in D.C.: The Mismatch Between Need and Treatment

Child well-being is important for community and economic development in our city. Young children with strong mental health are prepared to develop crucial skills that help build the basis of a prosperous and sustainable society. When we ensure the healthy development of members of the next generation, they will pay that back through productivity and responsible citizenship.


DATA SNAPSHOT

Improving Quality Child Care Options for All DC Children

Our city’s prosperity will be determined by how we support the education and well-being of our youngest citizens. The first five years of life, particularly the first three, are a time of critical human development, when the foundation for lifelong learning and success is built to last through adulthood. Nearly 33,000 children under the age of five live in the District. Approximately 19,000 DC children are birth to age three, and nearly one-quarter (26 percent) of them live in poverty.


POLICY SNAPSHOT

Medicaid and CHIP Provide Coverage to More Than Half of All Children in D.C.

Medicaid and CHIP are crucial parts of the social safety net, providing health insurance coverage to more than half of all children ages 0–21 in D.C.1 and a third of children nationally.2 Without these two programs, more than 97,000 children in the District would have been uninsured in 2010.3 New research indicates that compared with the uninsured, Medicaid recipients are more likely to seek medical treatment, report better physical and mental health and experience less financial stress.4 Protecting Medicaid/CHIP is extremely important to safeguarding the health and well-being of our most vulnerable children. The difficult fiscal environment currently facing both D.C. and the federal government will almost certainly impact the future of public health insurance coverage for children and their families.


DATA SNAPSHOT

Child Abuse and Neglect

After spiking in fiscal year (FY) 2009, substantiated cases of child abuse and neglect in the District returned to more historic levels in FY 2010. Data show that child abuse and neglect have been declining across the country, but there is no evidence of that trend in D.C.


 

Visit our DC KIDS COUNT Data Center