Little Citizens, Big Issues

The status quo isn't working for #DCKIDS

Letter from the Executive Director Dear Friend, Today kicks off the first day of the Performance Oversight and Budget Season at the Wilson Building. Over the next four months, DC Action will testify at both agency performance oversight and budget hearings in order to ensure that the interests of all DC children and their families are 1) heard, 2) prioritized...

Serving Students Means Promoting Attendance Supports, Not Absenteeism Penalties

When it comes to attendance, every day counts: regular school attendance is one of the most powerful ways we can set students up for success in school and in life. [1] If you follow local DC news, you’ve likely heard discussion of attendance and related community and government officials concerns about the chronic absenteeism of DCPS’ graduating seniors. Though the...

Testimony at the Public Hearing on the Student Fair Access to School Act of 2017

Testimony of Shana Bartley, Acting Executive Director DC Action for Children Public Hearing on B22-0594 - Student Fair Access to School Act of 2017 Before the Committee on Education Council of the District of Columbia January 30, 2018 DC Action for Children (DC Action) is pleased to provide written testimony in support of proposed legislation, B22-0594 the Student Fair Access...

Our 2018 Resolutions

Letter from the Executive Director Dear Friend, Happy New Year! Before the holidays, the DC Action team spent some time reflecting on the status of children in our city and country and decided to create a set of new year’s resolutions. These resolutions represent our commitment to ensuring that the District is a great place for children to call home....

DC Action's Testimony at the Public Hearing on the Maternal Mortality Review Committee Establishment Act of 2017

Testimony of Shana Bartley, Acting Executive Director DC Action for Children Public Hearing on B22-0522 The Maternal Mortality Review Committee Establishment Act of 2017 Before the Committee on the Judiciary and Public Safety Council of the District of Columbia December 7, 2017 DC Action for Children is pleased to provide written testimony in support of proposed legislation, B22-0522 The Maternal...

DC's Income Inequality Negatively Affects Children

A few days ago, the Census Bureau released it latest five-year block of data (2012 – 2016) – and with this update, we’re able to see how the profile of District residents is changing. In reviewing the demographic indicators aligning with DC Action’s research and policy interests, I kept returning to ones centered around income distribution, median household income and...

Fall Letter from the Executive Director

​ Letter from the Executive Director Dear Friend, I always look forward to this time of year for the opportunity to reflect and give thanks for the experiences, challenges and accomplishments that shape our perspective and our path forward. We have much to be grateful for, including you and your commitment to DC's children. This year, we also celebrated an...

2017 Race for Results Follow-Up: We shouldn’t depend on data for the whole story

The Annie E. Casey Foundation recently released their 2017 Race for Results report , highlighting persistent disparities for children in immigrant families across the country. As a KIDS COUNT grantee, we jointly supported its release by composing our own press release comparing District-level trends and realities to those felt collectively by children of color and children in immigrant families across...

The case for funding home visiting locally

It’s that time again: budget development season is here and funding is on everyone’s mind. Advocates are scrambling to finalize Fiscal Year 2019 budget asks, while DC agencies have put their pencils down on their own budget requests. In the backdrop of this shuffle, funding is at risk for important federal programs supporting young children and their families. One such...

DC’s youngest children will be affected by proposed EPA budget cuts

Exposure to lead can be life-threatening for young children. Because their lungs, immune and nervous systems are not fully developed, children under 5 are more sensitive to chemicals and are unable to combat any extensive exposure to these toxins. [1] Contact with unsafe chemicals also dramatically increases a child’s risk of pneumonia, asthma and other chronic respiratory diseases. [2] Last...